Sunday, November 17, 2019

Top Best Blog Posts of the 2010s

Self (2010)
I do not recall celebrating the end of the first decade of this century, we just kept calm and carried on. Today, however, there are all kinds of folks asking, "How did you spend the past ten years?"

Ye, gods. I shudder to think. That would be called my 40s, and they flew by. What on earth did I do with them? I don’t feel like I’m any different, anywhere different than I was in 2009.

But the end of that year was when I was awarded a Creative Workforce Fellowship, which was an important step in my journey as a professional playwright
My primary goal in having received the fellowship was to write a play inspired by the events of 1936, and to that end I began this blog, Cleveland Centennial. Most of 2010 was spent chronicling my research, then this blog became a general repository for my thoughts and experiences regarding playwriting and theater.

Reviewing over one thousand unique entries, and in chronological order, here are my Ten Best Blog Posts of the 2010s.

My Last Harvey Pekar Story (7/12/2010)
The day my five year-old son taught me how to mourn.

The Hobbit (12/11/2011)
Researching the events of World War One led to reconsideration of a book I thought I knew.

On the Scary (10/4/2012)
A winding discourse on what scares us, and how the worst monsters are real.

Before Sunrise, Before Sunset (9/18/2013)
Experiencing the first two installments of Linklater’s trilogy inspired a new work.

Guardians of the Galaxy (8/10/2014)
Our doomed desire to pass deeply felt emotions onto others through our favorite tunes.

Brian Chandler Cook performs "I Hate This" (9/9/2015)
Witnessing the transference of your story to another.

Theater of War (1/9/2016)
My job, in a nutshell, and the last book I ever loaned my father.

Objectively/Reasonable (3/7/2017)
The Cold Civil War begins, and everyone is forced to choose a side.

Single White Fringe Geek (10/8/2018)
The single most helpful review I ever received was negative.

My Own Private Dramaturge (6/8/2019)
How we carry the wisdom of our fathers, sometimes literally.

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